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1.6K Year-Old Byzantine tomp Found in Syria After Forest Fire

1.6K Year-Old Byzantine tomp Found in Syria After Forest Fire

A forest fire in the Hama province of Syria has uncovered an archaeological structure dating back to the Byzantine period, about 1600 years ago. The fire is said to have caused environmental damage, but it has also led to an important archaeological discovery.

The tomb patterns symbolizing Christianity

The structure found is a pyramid tomb located north of the Fakru village. The tomb is six meters wide and six meters long, and it was built as a mausoleum. The tomb is decorated with different patterns symbolizing Christianity, as well as peacocks, bull-shaped inscriptions, and decorations. Bones of cattle and poultry were also found near the structure.

The oldest pyramid tombs

Although the interior of the tomb has been partially damaged, archaeologists say that the structure is an important archaeological discovery. The tomb dates back to the Byzantine Empire and is one of the oldest pyramid tombs in the region. The tomb could help to better understand Byzantine culture and history in the region.

The fire is said to have caused environmental damage, burning down an estimated 10,000 acres of forest. The fire also caused damage to people living in the area. The provinces of Latakia and Hama were the most affected by the fire.

The fire is one of many challenges facing Syria. The country is also struggling with a civil war and an economic crisis. The fire is another challenge that Syria is facing.

It’s important for Syria

However, the fact that the fire has led to an important archaeological discovery is somewhat hopeful. The fire could help to better understand Byzantine culture and history in the region. This could be an important step for Syria’s future.

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